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Monday, July 6, 2015

City rejects 3-lane Lake

Tuesday, December 4, 2001

Council action paves way for Concordia School potential move.

North Lake Avenue will keep its four lanes. The Storm Lake City Council decided last night to keep the road the same after examining the possibility of rebuilding it as a three-lane.

Also at yesterday's council meeting a decision was made on locating schools in commercial zones and the council acted on closing three railroad crossings.

The city council had to decide how to rebuild North Lake Avenue for a major reconstruction project scheduled for next year. Members of the city's traffic safety team recommended making the road three lanes to the city council.

Business owners were overwhelmingly opposed to a three-lane North Lake. City council members toured the area last week by bus to examine the possible impact.

Although the city had leaned toward a three-lane, "In light of adjacent property owners, the Storm Lake Area Development Corporation and the general public, it is recommended that the design remain four lane," City Administrator John Call said in a report to council members Monday.

"At this point in time, the most important point is that the road be rebuilt so that it can serve the public and adjacent businesses for the next 40 years," Call said.

The design of North Lake will maintain the current 45-foot width with four lanes of traffic, which will also have the least impact on trees along the route.

The City of Storm Lake approved an agreement several months ago to accept jurisdiction of North Lake from the Iowa Department of Transportation.

The state is also providing Storm Lake with $905,000 for a complete reconstruction of North Lake Avenue from Milwaukee to approximately 12th Street. Work on the south portion of the road will include a total reconstruction, along with new curbing, gutters and storm sewers. Remaining funds would be used to complete an asphalt overlay project on North Lake north of 12th Street during the summer of 2003.

In other news:

* The council amended city zoning ordinance to allow schools to be located in a commercial district. The action comes as Concordia Lutheran School is in process of finding a new location for its school.

Concordia is interested in purchasing the former Storm Lake Sports Center at 915 West Milwaukee, but that area is zoned C-2 commercial.

Current zoning ordinance does not allow a parochial school to obtain a special exception to operate in a C-2 district.

The city council changed its zoning ordinance to allow any type of schools to apply for a special exception to be located in a C-2 commercial zone.

Scott Olesen, city code enforcement officer, said the school feels it would not have adverse effects to other permitted uses.

Concordia Lutheran School will now go back to the zoning board of adjustment to request a special exception to locate a school in that area.

* The council passed the second reading of an ordinance to close railroad crossings at Seneca, Grand and College.

The city's traffic safety team has been studying the issue throughout the summer. The action is part of an agreement between the city and Illinois Central Canadian National Railway to close three crossings for upgrades the company did at other crossings earlier this year.

The city is applying for grants to fund improvements at other crossings in city limits.

Public Safety Director Mark Prosser reported to the council that the costs of extending a sidewalk over the tracks at Seneca would be $2,000. However, he said the railroad does not like to have sidewalks on their property. Prosser said the city will continue to work with the railroad to find a solution.

* The council gave final approval to the Chautauqua Park Shelter House project at a cost of $161,345.59.

The project consisted of a complete remodeling and the addition of new handicapped accessible restrooms, an outdoor fireplace and remodeled kitchen areas.

The Paxton Family Trust purchased the landscaping around the shelter house.



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